Beyond Bulls & Bears

Staying Nimble Amid an Uncertain Outlook
Perspectives

Staying Nimble Amid an Uncertain Outlook

Bouts of volatility hit markets across the globe in the third quarter of 2019 amid continued uncertainties about global growth and trade. Central banks took notice, with the US Federal Reserve easing interest rates for the first time in more than a decade and the European Central Bank also cutting rates and reintroducing quantitative easing. Against this backdrop, our senior investment leaders discuss why they do not see a recession in the near term, but are taking a cautious and nimble approach.

Real Assets Could Be the Alternative
Multi-Asset

Real Assets Could Be the Alternative

Given the backdrop of a slowing global economy and shaky investor sentiment tied to trade tensions, Franklin Templeton Multi-Asset Solutions' Ed Perks and Gene Podkaminer are calling for an active investment approach. In the latest edition of “Allocation Views,” they outline six major themes driving their current views: slower global growth, subdued inflation, monetary policy effectiveness, the importance of nimble management, real assets, and alternative assets that aren’t really alternative enough.

Trade Tensions Flare: Where Do We Go from Here?
Multi-Asset

Trade Tensions Flare: Where Do We Go from Here?

Market volatility has been on the rise as US-China trade tensions continue to flare and recent central bank activity has created more questions than answers. As such, many investors have been on edge. Franklin Templeton Multi-Asset Solutions CIO Ed Perks, and Gene Podkaminer, Head of Multi-Asset Research Strategies, present the team’s latest thoughts on where the global economy is headed—and how investors should think about risk today. They say the persistent uncertainty calls for a cautious and nimble stance.

PODCAST: Midyear Outlook: Reining in Risk
Perspectives

PODCAST: Midyear Outlook: Reining in Risk

Equity markets continued to march higher in the first half of 2019, despite trade uncertainties and recessionary fears. An abrupt change to a more dovish stance among central bankers has recently provided fresh tinder to the equity fire. But does a looser policy stance signal there are cracks in the global economy’s foundation? Our senior investment leaders share their views on investing in uncertain times and how their outlooks have changed from earlier this year. They weigh in on market divergence, whether there is simply too much focus on the US Federal Reserve, where they see pockets of opportunity and how they are looking to play defense.

Should Markets Heed Recession Warnings?
Multi-Asset

Should Markets Heed Recession Warnings?

Our Multi-Asset Solutions CIO Ed Perks discusses how markets are reacting to the possibility of a US recession, and explains why he favors a defensive stance. Read more.

Is the US Yield Curve Signaling a US Recession?
Fixed Income

Is the US Yield Curve Signaling a US Recession?

Although one part of the US yield curve has inverted this year, investment leaders from Franklin Templeton explain why they aren’t concerned about a US recession—at least not yet.

PODCAST: Market Resilience: Strength in Numbers
Perspectives

PODCAST: Market Resilience: Strength in Numbers

Concerns about where the financial markets are heading are at the forefront of many investors’ minds. The risks of a US or global recession this year continue to persist amid slowing global growth, trade tensions and worries about potential geopolitical shocks. Our senior investment leaders see a different story unfolding. In this roundtable discussion, they outline why they think some market observers are misguided and where they see opportunities today.

Putting Equity-Market Turbulence into Context
Multi-Asset

Putting Equity-Market Turbulence into Context

Many equity investors were no doubt happy to put 2018 in the rear-view mirror. The heightened volatility in the fourth quarter of the year in particular took many investors by surprise—but what is often missing in the discussions about the volatility is that it didn’t stem from a broad deterioration in economic fundamentals, according to Ed Perks, CIO, Franklin Templeton Multi-Asset Solutions. And, he notes investors had become so used to low levels of volatility that 2018 actually marked a return to “normal levels.”

PODCAST: Making Sense of Recent Market Action
Perspectives

PODCAST: Making Sense of Recent Market Action

After a turbulent end to 2018, early January brought some relief for equity investors, but there certainly are no shortage of uncertainties about the year ahead. Three of our senior investment leaders recently participated in panel discussion about what they see affecting investor sentiment, how they think changes in monetary policy are influencing market action and why they don’t see a US recession this year.  

Distortion, Divergence and Diversification: 2019 Global Investment Outlook
Perspectives

Distortion, Divergence and Diversification: 2019 Global Investment Outlook

Volatility has plagued equity markets globally in 2018—most notably emerging markets and US equity markets. As the US economic expansion officially crossed the nine-year mark in 2018, many investors started to wonder when the cycle would change—and what the catalyst might be. Our senior investment leaders see plenty of reasons to be optimistic about the year ahead, but recognize investment opportunities may be more divergent, with some previously overlooked countries or asset classes potentially taking the spotlight.

Assessing a Divided Congress and Market Fundamentals
Multi-Asset

Assessing a Divided Congress and Market Fundamentals

“In general, we think a divided Congress will likely leave the overall direction of policy unchanged. We don’t see major changes to tax, spending or trade policies.” – Ed Perks, CIO of Franklin Templeton Multi-Asset Solutions

The US Yield Curve: Should We Fear Inversion?
Fixed Income

The US Yield Curve: Should We Fear Inversion?

There has been a lot of talk this year about the flattening of the US yield curve—which is a graphical representation of the spread between short- and long-term interest-rate instruments. Our senior investment leaders make a case that the “predictive power” of the yield curve when it comes to the US economy may not really be so predictive this time around.